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Campus Degree Options in Kentucky (KY)


Industry Snapshot: KY Careers and Schools

As the United States faces growing economic woes, Kentucky is not faring so badly. As noted by the U.S. Department of Commerce, Kentucky is one of six states to experience personal income gains between 2008 and 2009. In addition, Kentucky has the second-lowest cost of living in the country. According to Trey Grayson, Kentucky's Secretary of State, the state's economy is heavily anchored in the following job markets: agriculture, manufacturing & transportation, natural resources, and tourism.

What Does the Job Market Mean for KY Careers and Salaries?

Kentucky anticipates big growth in health-related careers between 2008 and 2018. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the biggest growth, an anticipated 29.7 percent, is expected for medical assistants, whose mean 2009 salary was $26,470. 27.7 percent growth is anticipated for pharmacy technicians, whose 2009 mean salary was $24,480. Jobs for registered nurses, who earned a mean $58,110 in 2009, are expected to grow by 23.8 percent. In job markets noted by Grayson, top jobs, with 2009 mean salaries, include: agricultural managers: $46,430; agricultural inspectors: $39,540; industrial production managers: $80,600; purchasing managers: $83,810.

How Can Kentucky Schools Help You Start a Career?

Kentucky schools might lead you to a more lucrative career. The BLS reports that those with associate's degrees earn an average $135 more a week than those with high school diplomas only. Bachelor-degree holders typically earn $264 more a week than those with associate's degrees. To find managerial and inspectors' positions, or to become an RN, a bachelor's degree is usually required. Pharmacy technicians and medical assistants generally need an associate's degree. The flexibility of online degree programs makes it easier for you to attend Kentucky schools, no matter what you study.