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Grow the World With a Career In Landscape Design

Grow the World With a Career In Landscape Design

by Debbie Wilson
January 27, 2010

With land costs rising coupled with the increase in public demand for land and yard beautification, a career in landscape design could be the perfect one for you.  In fact, the number of new construction projects today, both residential and commercial, makes the importance of proper landscape design paramount.  Government compliance to environmental regulations, land use zoning, and water restrictions will also continue to spur the need for qualified landscape architects. 

Landscape Architect Career Explained

You may be asking yourself, "Exactly what does a landscape architect do?"  Well, besides the well-known homeowners backyard remodel, landscape architects work for a variety of types of organizations, including real estate development, parks, playgrounds, campuses, shopping centers, golf courses, and much, much more.  And not only do they design these areas for function, but they also design for the purpose of attaining beautification and compatibility of the surrounding environment.  While doing this, they must also take into account local, State, and Federal regulations in order to protect wetlands and historic resources within and around the area.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, more than 75 colleges and universities offer undergraduate and graduate programs in landscape architecture accredited by the Landscape Architecture Accreditation Board.  Typical courses include technical subjects, such as surveying, landscape design, ecology, and construction.  Other courses involve plant and soil science, geology, and professional and management practice.  Most employers require a bachelor's degree, which usually takes 4 years to complete.  And because most states require landscape architects to be licensed, you will also be required to pass the Landscape Architect Registration Examination (L.A.R.E.).  This exam focuses on environmental laws and regulations, plants, soils, climate, and other characteristics unique to the State.  

So if you appreciate nature, possess creative vision, and enjoy working with your hands, consider a career in landscape design.  You can work as an apprentice or intern while obtaining your formal education and gain valuable hands-on experience.  When you graduate, you'll be ready to put your creative talents to work in the rewarding industry of landscape design.

About the Author
Debbie Wilson operates a lakeside resort. Her previous experience includes profitability consulting for a national healthcare company. Debbie holds a B.A. in Business Management.